26.09.2021»»воскресенье

How Much To Install Water Free Urinal

26.09.2021
  1. How Much To Install Water Free Urinals
  2. How Much To Install Water Free Urinal Cartridge
  3. How Much To Install Water Free Urinal Video
  4. How Much To Install Water Free Urinal System

Z6010 – 1-1/2” Water Closet Valve with back spud connection. Z6001 – 1-1/4” Urinal Valve with top spud connection. Z6003 – 3/4” Urinal Valve with top spud connection. FLOWS-FF Full Flow 3.0 Gal. For Urinal, 4.5 Gal. For Water Closet-HET High Effi ciency Toilet (PL Only) 1.28 Gal. For Water Closet-WS1 Low Consumption. If too much water comes through the lines, simply turn the water intake pressure down, by turning the knob on the fresh water feed. Again, this is a valve located where the fresh water intake meets the base of the urinal. Turning this knob open and close will regulate the water flow to the urinal basin. Our toilet installation service includes removal of your old toilet and installation of your newly purchased one; attachment of provided flange bolts, wax ring and supply line; testing of the new toilet; and debris cleanup. It Doesn’t Save That Much Water. We know, we said earlier that urinals use less water than toilets, and they technically do. On average, a toilet flush uses 1.6 gallons of water, while a conventional urinal uses 1.5 gallons per flush. That means you’re only saving a gallon of water or so a day, and that’s assuming you’re well-hydrated. Choose items to buy together. This item: Sloan 1001500 Water Free Urinal Cartridge. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Instant Power Professional Waterless Urinal Sealing Liquid, 8202, 128 Fl. $53.73 ($0.42/Fl Oz) In Stock.

INSTALLATION

The following information relates to the installation of Waterless urinals in new installation and retrofit situations. Most US Plumbing Codes require urinals to be installed so that the non-ADA urinal lip to floor height is 24' (610 mm), and for ADA* installations 17' (430 mm) urinal lip to floor.

Waterless urinals install like any conventional urinal fixture. Each urinal comes with the necessary hardware plus two EcoTraps®. In most retrofit situations, you can use the existing flange from the conventional urinal to install the touch-free urinal. Saves time!

Approximate installation times are:

  • Retrofit, simple change-out : 45 - 60 minutes

  • Retrofit, lower rough-in : 90 -120 minutes**

  • New Installation, with appropriate rough-in height: 15-25 minutes

Times are approximate and may vary according to present plumbing construction and materials.

**The additional cost to lower a rough-in may be in most cases 1 hour by a plumbing professional. This additional cost will usually just add a couple of months to your already short payback period.

NON-ADA URINALS

To determine the correct rough-in (drain line) height for non-ADA urinals, measure the distance on your current flushed urinal from the bottom of the screws on the urinal to the restroom floor. This is your current rough-in height (A). Then consult the urinal specification sheet of your Waterless urinal of choice to install. Look for the distance measurement between the urinal outlet and lip. (B).

Add A+B to come up with the lip to floor height the Waterless urinal will give you.

Example 1: (A) is 15” (381 mm), (B) is 9”(229 mm) = 24”(610 mm) lip to floor. Simple exchange of urinal.

Example 2: (A) is 18”(457 mm), (B) is 9”(229 mm) = 27” (686 mm) lip to floor. Lower rough-in height by 3”(76 mm) to come to 24”(610 mm) total.

ADA URINALS

To determine the correct rough-in (drain line) height for ADA urinals, measure the distance on your current flushed urinal from the bottom of the screws on the urinal to the restroom floor. This is your current rough-in height (A). Then consult the urinal specification sheet of your Waterless urinal of choice to install. Look for the distance measurement between the urinal outlet and lip. (B).

How Much To Install Water Free Urinal

Add A+B to come up with the lip to floor height the Waterless urinal will give you.

Example 1: (A) is 8'(203 mm), (B) is 9”(229 mm) = 17”(430 mm) lip to floor. Simple exchange of urinal.

Example 2: (A) is 12”(305 mm), (B) is 9”(229 mm) = 21”(533 mm) lip to floor. Lower rough-in height by 3”(76 mm) to come to 17”(430 mm) total.

* ADA is a uniquely U.S. requirement. Consult your local/national plumbing codes for required installation heights.

We’re guessing that at some point in your life, you’ve been standing at a public urinal and had the thought, “Why don’t I have one of these things at home?” It’s a fair question. Most public restrooms have urinals as a default option, but almost no homes do.

Urinals seem like such a common convenience it can be hard to figure out why more homes don’t have them as commodities. The question is is it worth the cost? Read on to learn about why there aren’t more home urinals.

Benefits of a Urinal

How much to install water free urinals

If you’re the kind of person who prefers to pee standing up, we probably don’t need to convince you that a home urinal would be cool. You can enjoy all the glory that a urinal brings to the bathroom experience without any worries about another person scoping your goods or standing too close. It’s your opportunity to live the dream life every day.

How Much To Install Water Free Urinals

But from a more practical standpoint, urinals can provide some more concrete benefits. For elderly people, not having to sit down and stand up from a toilet can reduce the risk of falls. And urinals use a little bit less water than toilets, making them more environmentally friendly.

Partners Don’t Like Them

The biggest reason we don’t see more urinals in homes is that many partners don’t like them. If you aren’t someone who pees standing up, you may not see the appeal; why would you add an ugly fixture you can’t use to your bathroom? They take up space and smell, and how hard is it really to use the toilet.

And these partners do have a point. As we’ll discuss in a moment, installing a urinal can be expensive, and it doesn’t make much sense to spend that much money to install something only one partner can use. Not to mention urinals aren’t exactly a typical feature in bathroom décor, and it can be hard to make them look like they belong in the space.

Cleaning Is Worse

While it is true that urinals allow you the maximum freedom in your peeing experience (aside from standing with your back to the wind and going nuts), it comes at a cost. How many times in your life have you ever had to clean a urinal? Assuming that number is zero, let’s imagine for a moment what that chore would look like.

Urinals tend to get a little more coated in urine than your average toilet, which makes them smell more. And cleaning them means wiping them down directly, a chore no one wants. Cleaning a toilet is easier and is needed less often since the water covers the entire bowl and takes most urine particles away with it.

They’re Expensive

Another huge reason we don’t see more urinals in the home is they’re an unnecessary expense, and not an insignificant one at that. Urinals cost between $600 and $2,000 depending on the model you get. And like with anything, the more you pay, the better it’s going to look, so realistically you’re looking at the top end of that price range.

And that $2,000 price tag is just for the cost of the urinal. That doesn’t begin to touch the installation costs, which include running new water lines, drain pipes, and potentially electricity for automatic flush switches. It’s a significant chunk of money for something that’s an indulgence at best.

It Doesn’t Add to the Home Value

Some people might try to argue that adding a urinal will add value to the home. After all, it’s such a useful and unique feature, right? Buyers are going to tour the home, see that there’s a urinal, and start making offers on the spot, because, sweet, this home has a urinal!

But in reality, putting in a urinal does nothing for the resale value of the home. That money you’re putting in will have a 0 percent return on investment. You’d be better off putting in a better toilet that you and your partner can both enjoy.

It Doesn’t Save That Much Water

We know, we said earlier that urinals use less water than toilets, and they technically do. On average, a toilet flush uses 1.6 gallons of water, while a conventional urinal uses 1.5 gallons per flush. That means you’re only saving a gallon of water or so a day, and that’s assuming you’re well-hydrated and home a lot.

If you’re looking to save water around the house, there are better ways to do so. Some people have explored grey water options for flushing their toilets. Others have suggested using your urine as a supplement for your lawn or garden rather than flushing it away.

Better Alternatives

On the subject of putting in a new toilet, that’s one of the best alternatives to adding a urinal. We know, your first priority is environmental conservation and you want to save water where you can. Well the good news is there are dual-flush toilets that can help you do that!

How Much To Install Water Free Urinal Cartridge

Dual-flush toilets offer you two options for flushing: number one or number two. If you pull the lever up, it’ll use a smaller amount of water, an option that both you and your partner can use to save twice as much water! We know, we’re sorry; adding a urinal isn’t a very practical option for the home.

Explore Home Urinal Options

How Much To Install Water Free Urinal Video

We know, having a home urinal would be one of the coolest things ever. And the option is becoming more popular, so don’t give up hope yet. Have a conversation with your partner if you have one, and seriously weigh whether the coolness factor is worth the few thousand dollars it’s going to cost you to get one installed.

How Much To Install Water Free Urinal System

If you’d like to explore the cost of getting a home urinal installed, get in touch with us at Beehive Plumbing. We can help you install a urinal or bidet, as well as do general and emergency plumbing repairs. Book an appointment with us now to discuss your bathroom remodel project.

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